Your Name and Title:
Claire Nickerson, Learning Initiatives & OER Librarian

Library, School, or Organization Name:
Fort Hays State University Forsyth Library

Co-Presenter Name(s):
N/A

Area of the World from Which You Will Present:
Hays, Kansas, United States

Language in Which You Will Present:
English

Target Audience(s):
Librarians and library staff with an interest in promoting open educational resources

Short Session Description (one line):
Learn how an academic library at a regional comprehensive university successfully designed and implemented a grant program to incentivize faculty to adapt and create OERs.

Full Session Description (as long as you would like):

Open Educational Resources, or OERs, will be important in the library of the future because of the growing public awareness of the cost of education and course materials. Openness is gaining momentum--according to the most recent Creative Commons State of the Commons report, there are more than a billion Creative-Commons licensed works online--and yet, according to the Opening the Textbook 2016 report, only 5.3% of courses use open textbooks.

However, public awareness of OERs is also growing. This past year saw the Department of Education hire a dedicated advisor for open education, the Affordable College Textbook Act was reintroduced to the US Legislature, Amazon launched a new K-12 OER platform called Amazon Inspire, and the Achieving the Dream Project funded open degree initiatives at 38 community colleges in 13 states.

Libraries have always been leaders in providing free opportunities for education, and should be involved in promoting OERs. Learn how an academic library at a regional comprehensive university successfully designed and implemented a grant program to incentivize faculty to adapt and create OERs, from drafting a call for proposals to sending out award letters: last winter, we received funding from a donor who was interested in supporting open education and our OER Committee drafted a submission form and a call for proposals that went through five revisions before being sent out. We held four information sessions for interested faculty, reviewed the proposals we received, and drafted and sent out award letters and agreements to be signed as well as rejection letters.

Attendees will hear about the concerns committee members and faculty voiced related to creating and revising OERs and learn to avoid some of the challenges that came up throughout the process, such as choosing the wrong platform for our proposal form and faculty not reading the CFP carefully.

Websites / URLs Associated with Your Session:
http://www.fhsu.edu/library/oer/grants/

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Hi, Claire!  Thanks for submitting this. It's interesting, but we feel that we'd need more information to really evaluate. What work was done, and how does it help inform the vision of "libraries of the future?"

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