Bringing Library Content to the Users with EEXCESS-Extensions and Plugins – Open Source Solutions to distribute Cultural and Scientific Content

 

Your Name and Title: DR Tamara Pianos

Library, School, or Organization Name: ZBW - German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics

Co-Presenter Name(s): DR Christin Seifert

Area of the World from Which You Will Present: Germany

Language in Which You Will Present: English

Target Audience(s): All libraries and librarians interested in academic and cultural content.

Short Session Description (one line):
Recommendation-prototypes developed in the EEXCESS-project, their potential use for libraries and ways to have new content included

Full Session Description (as long as you would like):
The EC-funded project EEXCESS developed a number of tools that help to inject relevant content in a privacy preserving manner into platforms that readers, students and researchers use in their daily work. One prototype is a Google Chrome Extension that can be used to get recommendations for related content from quality sources. A visualization dashboard with many different options can be used to filter the results. Users who are searching a specific topic e.g. in Wikipedia can find more related quality content on their topic through the Chrome Extension. Users who write a text in Google Docs can use the plugin to get references etc.

All EEXCESS developments are open source and can be used and adapted freely.
Libraries or cultural institutions like museums etc. who own repositories can submit their content for inclusion into EEXCESS. Among the content providers so far are Europeana, Mendeley, The Digital Public Library of America , The National Archives UK, Swissbib, Deutsche Digitale Bibliothek, Rijksmuseum – The Museum of the Netherlands, and Core.ac.uk, so that more than 150 Mio items are potentially recommended through EEXCESS. New content can be easily submitted through an Application Program Interface (API) supporting search functionalities.

A number of prototypes were developed in the project that are now available for public use. The benefit of the prototypes so far still depends on the focus of the search. As more content partners are included the recommendations cover more and more subject areas.

Privacy preservation is one of the key objectives of the project. (http://eexcess.eu/3-privacy-preservation/

Websites / URLs Associated with Your Session: http://eexcess.eu/

 http://liber2016.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/12-3_Borst_Taking_L...

Michael Granitzer and Christin Seifert. Taking Cultural and Scientific Content to Users through the EEXCESS Project. In: D-Lib Magazine, 2016, 22 http://www.dlib.org/dlib/march16/03inbrief.html

 

Views: 190

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Hi, Dr. Pianos.  Thank you for submitting this proposal.  This project looks very interesting--is it still in the technical stages, or do you have enough usage to identify specific future trends for the library because of it?  Are there privacy issues, and how have you addressed them?  

The title was also focused on the project, rather than trends or ideas.  If you were going to re-frame this specifically related to libraries of the future, is there a compelling message that could be used to describe the shifts?

Thanks!

Hi, thanks a lot for your feedback! Sorry, for the late reply.

We just changed the title. Also, here is some additional information. The project phase recently ended. The prototypes that are available to the public are in different stages of development.  Two example prototypes are a Google Chrome Extension that can be used to get recommendations for related content from quality sources and a Google Docs plugin recommending content while writing. Both prototypes have a an increasing user base. At the moment, the Chrome Extension and the Google Docs Plugin each have a couple of hundred users.

Privacy preservation is one of the key objectives of the project. (http://eexcess.eu/3-privacy-preservation/) Privacy issues were addressed in a work-package of the EEXCESS-project by the French National Institute of Applied Sciences (INSA) (https://www.insa-lyon.fr/en/insa-lyon)  All user requests are sent through the privacy component which guarantees that i) queries and users can not be linked to each other  (unlinkabblility) and ii) users can not be identified based on their the content they query (indistinguishability).

See also: Michael Granitzer and Christin Seifert. Taking Cultural and Scientific Content to Users through the EEXCESS Project. In: D-Lib Magazine, 2016, 22 http://www.dlib.org/dlib/march16/03inbrief.html

Best regards

Tamara and Christin

RSS

About

Follow #Library20

The Learning Revolution

© 2019   Created by Steve Hargadon.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service