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School Libraries

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Independent School Librarians 1 Reply

Started by Robyn Case. Last reply by Nicole Collins Oct 15, 2013.

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Comment by Georgia Grammatikou on October 26, 2011 at 3:13am

Hello from Greece,

Glad to join! I have just started to build our graphic novel collection. I have some concerns about the violent content and I would appreciate some advice on how we respond to questions and comments of the school-library committee or parents about that. Also does anyone of you have any good ideas for games or other ways to promote the collection?  

“See” you at the conference!!

 

Comment by Victoria Hall on September 11, 2011 at 11:15am
So glad I found this group. See lots of familiar names/faces. Steve Hargadon, you are amazing!
Comment by Craig Seasholes on July 25, 2011 at 7:25pm
I'm an elementary school librarian...and WLMA president elect excited to be working with Library2.011 Virtual Conference to share nine great webinars from our Washington (State) Library Media Association's Annual Conference October 14-15th.  Have a look at the conference info and webinar lineup and stay tuned for great online learning opportunities.
Comment by Jan on November 1, 2010 at 8:39pm
Hey all,
Looking forward to many good chats. Here's a link to my blog. http://www.libraryjan.com I work in a 6-12 independent school in Ann Arbor MI.
Comment by Georgeanne E. Bonifanti on March 8, 2010 at 9:07am
Yes, students check out independently. When they come to the desk for check out or if I am walking around helping whenI am not teaching I usu have a conv with them letting them know that the issues within the book are for older readers. Kids think that if the books are in YA that they are high level reading. The public libr in Charlotte is double leveled. k-6 downstairs and 7-12 upstairs.
My high school friends keeps telling me I am censoring when I query a student and tell them the books are for much older readers.
Comment by Eileen Vaughn on March 8, 2010 at 6:16am
Hmm.. That's a dilemma for you. I'm K-6 public, so for me elementary goes through grade 6. Our district calls Middle School 7th and 8th. When the students ask for YA books, I send them to the public library. Many students in 5th and 6th and a few in 4th are reading some of the popular YA's. They often buy them. Your school goes up to grade 8, so you really need that policy. Do your students check out books independently? I am only at my schools 1-2 days a week, so some students are making book choices on their own. Whatever is on the shelves is available. Of course, when I'm there, I try to advise.
Comment by Georgeanne E. Bonifanti on March 7, 2010 at 7:52pm
I'm in a public school prek-8. Our official policy is YA is for middle school...but is middle school 5-8 or 6-8? Not sure.....What do you think?
Comment by Eileen Vaughn on March 7, 2010 at 2:27pm
Very good topic - there are so may elementary students interested in The Hunger Games series this year. I do not have a policy, but I own the book and have let the older students pass it around. Do you have a policy? - Or are you working on one? For the younger set that wants a book - I generally ask that their parent checks it out for them. When I communicate with the parents then I have a better idea about what to do. Sometimes they say sure, but lots of times they say the child should wait to read a particular book. Basically, I'm not a boat rocker. It would make so much sense to just have a policy.
Comment by Georgeanne E. Bonifanti on March 6, 2010 at 6:05pm
Okay- anyone here have a YA collection in their elem middle school? If so do you have a written policy that limits the YA collection to a grade or age level? What do you say or do if a younger grade goes to check out books from the YA collectio?
Comment by Edward the Somethingth on April 28, 2009 at 1:17pm
Anyone working on gaming collections and/or programs in their school libraries? I'm thinking of starting a tri-console collection next Fall and have some titles in mind but would appreciate any ideas from others. Obviously focusing on art and strategy games over FPS and traditional platformers. I'm just not sure what sort of programming would fly at our school (independent Chicagoland 9-12, most families very well off).
 

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