This New Medium Consortium/EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative report, New Horizon 2007 presents 6 key trends that are driving change within Higher Education. While all 6 trends are noteworthy, I thought that the following three trends were directly relevant to this community, so I thought I'd share. They are:


"Information literacy increasingly should not be considered a given. Contrary to the conventional wisdom, the information literacy skills of new students are not improving as the post-1993 Internet boomlet enters college. At the same time, in a sea of user-created content, collaborative work, and instant access to information of varying quality, the skills of critical thinking, research, and evaluation are increasingly required to make sense of the world.

"The notions of collective intelligence and mass amateurization are pushing the boundaries of scholarship. Amateur scholars are weighing in on scholarly debates with reasoned if not always expert opinions, and websites like the Wikipedia have caused the very notion of what an expert is to be reconsidered. Hobbyists and enthusiasts are engaged in data collection and field studies that are making real contributions in a great many fields at the same time that they are encouraging debate on what constitutes scholarly work—and who should be doing it. Still to be resolved is the question of how compatible the consensus sapientum and the wisdom of the academy will be.

"Students’ views of what is and what is not technology are increasingly different from those of faculty. From small, flexible software tools to ubiquitous portable devices and instant access, students today experience technology very differently than faculty do, and the gap between students’ view of technology and that of faculty is growing rapidly. Mobile phones, to name just one example, are very different tools to students than to faculty; rather than being mere tools for voice communication, these devices store music, movies, and photos, keep students in touch with their friends by text and voice, and provide access to the wider world of the Internet at any time."

Taken from New Medium Consortium/EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative report, New Horizon 2007, p. 4.

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Comment by Liz Stevenson on November 24, 2007 at 8:47pm
Thanks for the link to the report - what great reading. I am currently putting together a proposal to offer "audience-created content" programmes to Young Adults at my public library. This report has been really useful in fine-tuning the focus of the programmes; to enable content creation without necessarily being a judge of what constitues great content. It just feels like a natural extension of what our traditional role has been - providing access without censorship. Thanks again.
Comment by Liz Stevenson on November 24, 2007 at 8:46pm
Thanks for the link to the report - what great reading. I am currently putting together a proposal to offer "audience-created content" programmes to Young Adults at my public library. This report has been really useful in fine-tuning the focus of the programmes; to enable content creation without necessarily being a judge of what constitues great content. It just feels like a natural extension of what our traditional role has been - providing access without censorship. Thanks again.

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