Library 2.018: Blockchain Applied: Impact on the Information Profession

We're excited to announce our second Library 2.018 mini-conference: "Blockchain Applied: Impact on the Information Profession," which will be held online (and for free) on Thursday, June 7th, from 12:00 - 3:00 pm US-Pacific Daylight Time (click for your own time zone).

This event is being organized in partnership with Drs. Sue Alman and Sandra Hirsh from the San Jose State University School of Information as part of their IMLS-funded investigation of the potential uses of blockchain technology for the information professions.

Blockchain technology has the potential for libraries to accomplish much more than housing electronic credentials. The technology enables a broader impact within the community and around the globe. Some suggestions being explored for blockchain applications in libraries include building an enhanced metadata center, protecting Digital First Sale rights, supporting community-based collections, and facilitating partnerships across organizations. This mini-conference will provide participants with an overview of blockchain technology and information about current applications within the information professions. Join the discussion on ways that blockchain technology can be used in libraries.

We invite all library professionals, employers, LIS students, and educators to provide input and participate this event.

This is a free event, being held online.

to attend live or to receive the recording links afterwards. Please also join this Library 2.0 network to be kept updated on this and future events. 

Participants are encouraged to use #library2018 and #libraryblockchain on their social media posts leading up to and during the event.


The School of Information at San José State University is the founding conference sponsor. Please register as a member of the Library 2.0 network to be kept informed of future events. Recordings from previous years are available under the Archives tab at Library 2.0 and at the Library 2.0 YouTube channel.


We will have a limited number of slots for presenter sessions. The call for proposals is HERE. We encourage all who are interested in presenting to submit. 

Funding for this project is made possible by a grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services – LG-98-17-0209-17. The views, presentations, conclusions or recommendations expressed on this website or in the conference do not necessarily represent those of the Institute of Museum and Library Services.



Sue Alman
Lecturer at the School of Information, San Jose State University

Sue Alman is on the School of Information faculty at San Jose State University. She has held teaching posts at the University of Michigan and University of Pittsburgh, and she is a consultant specializing in organizational behavior and planning. Her areas of specialization include Futures, Asynchronous Learning, Management, Strategic Planning, Interpersonal Communications, Marketing and Public Relations, Group Dynamics, and Cultural Diversity. In Fall 2014 she led a MOOC, The Emerging Future: Technology Issues and Trends, that attracted over 1700 global participants. More information about the MOOC can be found on the iSchool website or the MOOC repository. She is the organizer of the Library 2.0 Spring Summit, The Emerging Future: Technology and Learning.

Jason Griffey
Fellow at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University

Jason Griffey is the founder and principal at Evenly Distributed, a technology consulting and creation firm for libraries, museums, education, and other non-profits. Jason is an Affiliate Fellow at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, where he studies hyperlocal micronetworks such as his LibraryBox project and works on technologies that provide open and robust access to information for the future, such as blockchain and other decentralization technologies. Griffey has written extensively on technology and libraries, including multiple books and a series of full-periodical issues on technology topics, most recently Library Spaces and Smart Buildings: Technology, Metrics, and Iterative Design for ALA. Named a Library Journal Mover & Shaker in 2009, Griffey has written and spoken internationally on topics such as the future of technology and libraries, decentralization and the Blockchain, privacy, copyright, and intellectual property. In 2018, Griffey delivered the Gloriana St. Clair Distinguished Lecture in 21st Century Librarianship for the Carnegie Mellon campus in Education City, Qatar. A full list of his publications and presentations can be found on his CV. He is one of eight winners of the Knight Foundation News Challenge for Libraries for the Measure the Future project (, an open hardware project designed to provide actionable use metrics for library spaces. Griffey is the creator and director of The LibraryBox Project (, an open source portable digital file distribution system. He can be stalked obsessively online, and spends his free time with his daughter Eliza, reading, obsessing over gadgets, and preparing for the inevitable zombie uprising.

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